Nikon Museum Special Collection 2 Chapter 3
Nikon Museum Special Collection 2     Chapter 3

X-ray Regno Nikkor

X-ray Regno Nikkor Lenses

Regno-Nikkor 5cm f/1.5

Regno-Nikkor 5cm f/1.5 1944

Regno-Nikkor 5cm f/1.5

A lens for indirect radiography. There are two radiography methods: detect and indirect. With indirect radiography, a radiographic image is formed on a fluorescent plate, and then captured using a radiographic camera, Indirect radiography was commonly used for examinations of large numbers of people, because radiographic cameras were easy to use and utilized film rolls that enabled serial radiography.
Showa 19 (1944)

Regno-Nikkor 5cm f/1.5 1944

Regno-Nikkor 5cm f/1.5 1944

Regno-Nikkor 5cm f/1.5 Nr. 14061 1944

6cm f/0.85

6cm f/0.85 1937

6cm f/0.85

A 16mm cinema camera lens for radiography that was developed in response to a request from medical institutes. It is a large aperture ratio lens with an f-number of 0.85.
Showa 12 (1937)

6cm f/0.85 1937

6cm f/0.85 1937

6cm f/0.85 1937

6cm f/0.85 1937

6cm f/0.85 Nr. 2 1937

6cm f/0.85 1937
The wooden box is marked HANAOKA

Nikkor 3.5cm f/3.5

Nikkor 3.5cm f/3.5 1937

Nikkor 3.5cm f/3.5

A lens developed for 35mm format cameras that employed the Canon lens mount of that time. It was used in a device for recording numbers of telephone calls.
Showa 12 (1937)

Nikkor 3.5cm f/3.5 1937

Nikkor 3.5cm f/3.5 1937

Nikkor 3.5cm f/3.5 Nr. 354 1937

Regno-Nikkor 10cm f/1.5

Regno-Nikkor 10cm f/1.5 1947

Regno-Nikkor 10cm f/1.5

A lens for indirect radiography. In group medical examinations, 35mm film was used for chest radiography, but the resulting images were too small for accurate diagnosis, so a medium-format (6x6) camera was developed, with a dedicated holder for sheet film as well as film roll. An indirect radiography camera system using this lens was also developed.
Showa 22 (1947)

Regno-Nikkor 10cm f/1.5 1947

Regno-Nikkor 10cm f/1.5 1947

Regno-Nikkor 10cm f/1.5 1947

Regno-Nikkor 10cm f/1.5 1947

Spectrometer

Spectrometer 1936

Spectrometer

This spectrometer precisely measured prism angles as well as the refraction index of optical glass.
Showa 11 (1936)

Spectrometer 1936

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Chapter 0      Top Page
Chapter 1      1930s SUNAYAMA Nikkor
Chapter 2      Special Use Aero Nikkor
Chapter 3      X-ray Regno Nikkor
Chapter 4      Measuring Instruments, Binoculars
Chapter 5      All About NIKONOS

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